Work Habits

Micromanagement – Death By a Thousand Meetings

Have you ever heard the phrase “People don’t leave companies. They leave leaders?” I hope so, because it seems that every aspiring business guru has written, linked, blogged, or complained about the problem.  Good managers like to meet.  Poor managers like to meet…..A LOT.  Good meetings are productive.  Bad meetings suck the very will to live from you.  When you strip all of the fluff away, it seems that the purpose of most bad meetings is simply to schedule another bad meeting. A natural tendency of managers is to “manage” instead of actually LEAD.  But isn’t that what they’re hired to do?  Well, yes.  And, no.  While it may vary depending on the company and the roles of employees that you lead, nothing builds respect and loyalty quite like seeing your leader “in action” – down in the trenches, performing the job duties of his/her subordinates, with excellence and a cheerful spirit.  Obviously, a leader can’t spend excessive time doing this, but a good leader will jump into the fray from time to time.  Not only does this establish credibility… Read more

By Troy Hounshell, ago
Work Habits

The Great Lies of Business Ownership

The evil rich.  Those much maligned 1%-ers.  They made their millions off the backs of the working poor, right?  Or, they inherited their parents money and spend their time globetrotting around the world like your typical trust-fund baby.  Maybe most of them are Wall Street types who in are bed with both Democrats and Republicans, embodying everything that is broken with government today.  Who knows, maybe they were just lucky? I mean, somebody has to win the lottery, right?  WRONG. Undoubtedly, there are people who meet the descriptions above.  If all you watch is cable news and social media, you might think virtually ALL rich people meet those descriptions.  The funny thing about the truth, though, is that it exists whether you know it or not.  Facts are facts, and ignorance doesn’t change them.  In their phenomenal #1 bestseller, The Millionaire Next Door, Drs Thomas Stanley and William Danko extensively document the profile of an average millionaire in America.  Among other things, they note the following: Average age = 57 Approximately 66% are self-employed Approximately 75% of self-employed are entrepreneurs… Read more

By Troy Hounshell, ago